C o m m u n i t y H e a l t h I m p r o v e m e n t
C o l l a b o r a t i v e
CHIC

chic Partners Contact

Key People and Partner Organizations
(Logos are linked to organization web sites where possible)


Kenneth B. Wells, M.D., M.P.H.

Cathy Donald Sherbourne, Ph.D., is a RAND Senior Research and medical sociologist specializing in health outcome measurement for both adults and children, with a focus on mental health issues. Dr. Sherbourne has been the primary sociologist working on health status measurement, satisfaction, and the analyses of life stress, social and role functioning, social support, and mental health status, for several of RAND's large-scale health policy evaluations, including the RAND Health Insurance Experiment (HIE), the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS), Partners in Care (PIC), Health Care for Communities (HCC) and the HIV Costs and Service Utilization Study (HCSUS). Currently, Dr. Sherbourne is PI of an NIMH R01 on gender differences in quality of care and outcomes for depression; one of the PIs of a collaborative project testing the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of improving care for panic disorder; Co-PI of the NIMH-funded follow-up to for PIC; Co-PI of an NIMH R10 on quality improvement for depression, overall Co-PI (and RAND sub PI) of the UCLA/RAND NIMH-Center for Research on Managed Care for Psychiatric Disorders, Co-PI of Healthcare for Communities; and Co-PI of a project evaluating access and barriers to appropriate mental health services for persons with HIV, using the HCSUS data set. Dr. Sherbourne has collaborated extensively with Dr. Wells in research development, management, implementation, oversight, and in scientific products.

Robert H. Brook, M.D., Sc.D., is Vice-President and Director of RAND Health, and Professor of Medicine and Health Services at the Center for Health Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he is Co-Director with Dr. Wells of the Robert Wood Johnson UCLA Clinical Scholars Program. A board-certified internist, he received his M.D. and Sc.D. degrees from Johns Hopkins University. He has been on the medical school faculty at UCLA since 1974, and divides his research time between UCLA and RAND. Dr. Brook is a leading expert in the field of quality measurement, having operationalized the concept of appropriateness by establishing the scientific basis for determining whether various medical and surgical procedures were being used appropriately. Dr. Brook has received numerous professional honors, including the Peter Reizenstein Prize, 2000, for his paper "Defining and Measuring Quality of Care: A Perspective from US Researchers," the National Committee for Quality Assurance Health Quality Award for pursuit of health care quality at all levels of the health system, Research!America's 2000 Advocacy Award for Sustained Leadership at the National Level, the Robert J. Glaser Award of the Society of General Internal Medicine, the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Foundation Award of the American College of Physicians, and the Distinguished Health Services Research Award of the Association of Health Services Research. He is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine, the American Association of Physicians, the Western Association of Physicians, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the American Society for Clinical Investigation. He was selected as one of 75 Heroes of Public Health by Johns Hopkins University and is a member of the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars.

Peter J. Mendel, Ph.D., is an organizational researcher specializing in the dynamics of healthcare systems, healthcare reform and quality improvement. He was a principal co-author of a Robert Wood Johnson-funded study that developed an organizational field framework for analyzing institutional changes in healthcare and their effects on medical providers and systems in the San Francisco Bay Area over a fifty-year period. This work received the Max Weber Award for best scholarly book in organizational sociology in 2001 and the Freidson Award for outstanding contribution to medical sociology in 2002 from the American Sociological Association. He is also a key investigator for Dr. Wells' NIMH Center and for the RWJ-supported evaluation of provider collaboratives for improving chronic illness care.

Katherine Watkins, M.D., M.S.H.S., is a psychiatrist and a Scientist in the RAND Health Program and Drug Policy Research Center, and the primary liaison to Behavioral Health Services. She also consults on substance abuse and mental health issues to the Los Angeles Department of Mental Health. She combines a research background in effectiveness research and a clinical background in developing and providing services to individuals with both substance abuse and mental illness. She is PI of the CSAT-funded effectiveness study (Improving Care for Co-Occurring Disorders), which modifies the Partners in Care intervention model to support access to mental health services for persons in substance abuse treatment through Behavioral Health Services. Dr. Watkins is an investigator in the Healthcare for Communities Project and the NIMH Research Center on Managed Care for Psychiatric Disorders. She directs the intervention research training seminar for the Clinical Scholars Program.

Paul Koegel, Ph.D., is a medical and urban anthropologist whose research has focused primarily on the adaptation of marginal populations to contemporary urban settings and how the systems of care that are mandated to assist them either facilitate or hinder that adaptation. Through his 25-year research career he has addressed these issues in vulnerable populations, including adults with mental retardation, homeless individuals, adults with serious mental illness, and substance abusers. He has specialized in integrating qualitative methods associated with anthropology, epidemiological methods, evaluation techniques, and health services methods and perspectives. He is the senior qualitative expert for the NIMH UCLA/RAND Center's Methods Core. He is Co-PI of the seven-year follow-up of Partners in Care, and co-PI of the evaluation team for the CHIC pilot, Witness for Wellness initiative, a community-based participatory research effort based in South Los Angeles that serves as a main CHIC pilot project for this proposal.

Gery Ryan, Ph.D., has done extensive fieldwork on medical decision making in Africa, Latin America and the United States, including modeling how laypeople in rural Cameroon make general medical choices, how mothers in Mexico treat childhood illnesses, and how HIV+ individuals decide to adhere to antiretroviral medications. Ryan also has worked on several child and maternal health projects with WHO projects including the Focus Ethnographic Study (FES) of childhood diarrhea and acute respiratory illnesses and the Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI).

Ryan is an investigator on two NIMH-funded projects, one interviewing mental and physical health providers regarding care for the severely mentally ill (SMI) with HIV/AIDS and the other examining the networks of care among mental and physical health providers in Los Angeles and New York. He is co-PI of the Methods Core of the UCLA/RAND NIMH Center and of the NIMH seven-year follow-up study for Partners in Care, Ryan also specializes in applying systemic methods to qualitative research and designing tools to evaluate attitudes and beliefs health-related topics. He recently completed a NSF grant to examine systematic techniques for analyzing text and has published widely on qualitative methods.

Marcia A. Ellison, Ph.D., has over 10 years experience conducting and analyzing key informant and focus group interviews. She is currently an investigator in the Witness for Wellness Project, a main CHIC pilot for this proposal. Her roles on this project include documenting the development and processes of this community-academic coalition through participant observation, focus groups and key informant interviews; identifying appropriate indicators to assess and track outcomes; and training community participants in qualitative data analysis techniques and the presentation of qualitative research findings. Dr. Ellison has used qualitative interviews to identify the community factors that are associated with gaps in service and barriers to care for alcohol and drug treatment providers in Los Angeles County, and to explore the social contexts and long-term outcomes of single women's decision to become a single mother, terminate a pregnancy, or adopt away their infant, and the impact of iatrogenic multiple births on family quality of life and to determine the unmet health needs of these vulnerable families.

Ricky N. Bluthenthal, Ph.D., is a Social Scientist at RAND and an Assistant Professor in the Psychiatry Department at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. His research involves substance abuse prevention and harm reduction as well as mental health care in vulnerable populations. He is the Principal Investigator on two on-going studies of needle-exchange: a NIDA-funded study comparing the effectiveness of different models of syringe exchange programs and the CDC-funded California Syringe Exchange Program Study, aimed at examining the impact of a new state law that permits local jurisdictions to legalize syringe and needle exchange programs in California. He is also co-leading the evaluation of the Witness for Wellness project with Drs. Koegel and Ellison.

Tora Kay Bikson, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist in the Behavioral Sciences Department of the RAND Corporation, where she chairs RAND's Institutional Review Board. Her research has investigated properties of advancing information technologies in varied user contexts, addressing such issues as what factors affect the successful incorporation of innovative tools in ongoing activities and how new work media influence group structures and interaction processes. Previously, she has taught courses on ethical issues in human subjects research in the RAND Graduate School and in the Honors College at the University of California at Los Angeles. She has also served on committees concerned with information technology, human research participant protection, and data privacy at the National Academies.

Kathryn Pitkin Derose, Ph.D., M.P.H., is an Associate Social Scientist at RAND and has nearly twenty years experience with community health and health care for the underserved. Dr. Derose is bilingual (English-Spanish) and has both programmatic and research experience partnering with communities and using qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Recent projects at RAND include evaluating Community Voices Miami, a five-year Kellogg Foundation-funded initiative that mobilized community stakeholders to improve access to care for the uninsured in Miami-Dade County; a five-year National Cancer Institute-funded community trial of mammography promotion with 45 churches in Los Angeles County; a study sponsored by a Philadelphia hospital system that explored evidence-based decisionmaking for community health programs; and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded study that synthesized lessons learned by community-based approaches to reducing racial and ethnic disparities in health. Prior to coming to RAND, Dr. Derose directed a study of the effects of literacy and language barriers on the delivery of care in a large county hospital in Los Angeles and spent six years working in community development and health promotion in Latin America.

Emmett Keeler, Ph.D., is a senior mathematician at RAND and proposed as a member of the Practical Trials Design Work Group. He has led many large health projects including the Childbirth Outcomes project, and the Improving Chronic Illness Care Evaluation. This study evaluated whether collaboratives worked to disseminate a new model of chronic illness care to the 56 organizations that signed up to improve their care. He led the technical analysis in the Prospective Payment System Quality of Care evaluation, focusing on ways to risk adjust outcomes, and the relationship between explicit, implicit and outcome based measures of hospital quality. His recent projects include studies of hospital competition, Medical Savings Accounts and methods for case-mix adjusting HMO payments to reduce incentives for risk selection and under-provision of care. Last year he won the Academy Health's Distinguished Investigator Award. He is a professor at UCLA and the RAND Graduate School, teaching health economics and cost-effective analysis.

Lisa Jaycox, Ph.D., is a Behavioral Scientist at RAND (Arlington, VA) and a clinical psychologist. Dr. Jaycox is an investigator in the UCLA/RAND NIMH Center, co-PI of Youth Partners in Care, and has been a lead investigator in many projects concerning adolescent depression and psychological responses to exposure to violence. She was recently awarded a grant from the CDC to evaluate an intimate partner violence prevention program for Latino youth.

Bradley Stein, M.D., Ph.D., is Associate Director, Mental and Behavioral Health, RAND Center for Domestic and International Health Security, and an Assistant Professor of Child Psychiatry at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California. He is proposed as the head of the Violence Tracer Task Force. He is lead author of a paper recently published in JAMA documenting the effectiveness of a program providing school-based mental health services to traumatized children in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) that was developed as part of a participatory research collaboration between RAND, LAUSD, and UCLA. Dr. Stein is also PI of a federally funded study examining the implementation of the LAUSD Youth Suicide Prevention Program. Dr. Stein's current research activities also include an evaluation of the effectiveness of depression diagnosis feedback and patient activation among depressed teens identified in primary care settings, an ongoing analyses of national survey data regarding American's emotional and behavioral response to terrorism, and an examination of risk perception, decision-making, and health behaviors among victims of the anthrax attacks in Washington, D.C. Dr. Stein is a former Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar and NIMH Faculty Scholar.

Mark A. Schuster, M.D., M.P.P., Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Public Health at UCLA, Senior Natural Scientist at RAND, and Co-Director of the RAND Center for Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health Research. He is the Founder and Director of the UCLA/RAND Center for Adolescent Health Promotion, a community-based participatory research center funded by the CDC. Dr. Schuster conducts research primarily on child, adolescent, and family issues. Currently, he is leading an NIMH-funded project to develop and evaluate a worksite-based parenting program for parents of adolescents to learn communication skills and foster healthy sexual development and sexual risk prevention. He is head of the L.A. site of the CDC-funded "Healthy Passages," which is seeking to identify the etiologies of and influences on health and behavioral outcomes by studying 5,250 ten-year olds in three cities annually to age 20. He is also conducting an NICHD study examining the impact of parents' HIV on their uninfected children. Dr. Schuster has been studying the effects of the terrorist attacks on stress and coping in a nationally representative sample of Americans. He is on the pediatric team of the Global Quality Assessment Tool study, and has developed a set of indicators for measuring the quality of care for public health services. Dr. Schuster is also Associate Director of the Robert Wood Johnson UCLA Clinical Scholars Program.

Paul G. Shekelle, M.D., Ph.D., is a consultant in health sciences at RAND, Professor of Medicine at the UCLA School of Medicine, and a staff physician at the VA Medical Center in West Los Angeles. His research focus has been in the application of innovative methods to the assessment and improvement of the quality of care. Dr. Shekelle is been the Director of the Southern California Evidence-Based Practice Center, and has led numerous systematic reviews and meta-analyses in that capacity. Dr. Shekelle also co-directs the Assessing Care of the Vulnerable Elderly project, which seeks to develop a comprehensive set of quality tools to assess care for this population.

Maureen Carney, M.S., is a social scientist who has been engaged in health policy research at RAND for the past 23 years. Ms. Carney has served as project administrator for many studies with large data collection efforts. In this capacity, she has planned, budgeted, and executed health examinations for participants of two multi-state, multi-year studies: the Health Insurance Experiment and the Medical Outcomes Study. She also coordinated the abstraction of 17,000 medical records from 300 hospitals for RAND's DRG Quality of Care Study, and 8,000 medical records from 100 facilities for a Rehabilitation Facilities study. As project administrator for the Management and Outcomes of Childbirth PORT, she designed and implemented the recruitment of 2,400 new moms from 30 hospitals for participation in a telephone survey and medical record abstraction. She was project administrator and investigator for Partners in Care, for which she developed implementation plans for patient recruitment, assisted with managed care plan and provider recruitment, hired and trained field staff, and coordinated the overall project implementation.

Barbara Levitan will assist with training survey researchers and serve as the primary liaison to the RAND Survey Group. She has 16 years of general survey research experience, with expertise in the management of field and telephone survey operations, and in staff recruitment and training. She oversaw survey operations for Partners in Care.

Gail Yeaple, developed web design for CHIC, has more than 25 years of experience in a combined background of business / print layout and production, with an emphasis on graphic, layout, and web design. She designed and launched the RAND Partners in Care (PIC) website.

 chic Partners Contact

 

CHIC Key People and Partner Organizations
(Logos are linked to organization web sites where possible)


Carol M. Mangione, M.D., M.S.P.H.,
is a Professor in the Department of Medicine of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and is a consultant in the RAND Health Program.

Dr. Mangione is Principal Investigator and Director of the NIA funded UCLA Resource Center for Minority Aging Research / Center for Health Improvement of Minority Elderly. She is a nationally-known expert in area of eye diseases, quality of life, and outcomes of vision care. Dr. Mangione has provided technical expertise in the areas of study design and measurement of health in over 10 federally funded studies. She is the principal investigator for 4 federally funded research projects. Dr. Mangione's currently funded research focuses on the care that older Latinos and African Americans with diabetes receive. As part of this research agenda she is a principal investigator for a project funded by the Centers for Disease Control to study the quality of care for persons from ethnic and racial minority groups with diabetes in managed care settings. This study also focuses on the management of hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular disease among the participants.

Dr. Mangione is PI of an NIH grant to conduct an empowerment intervention among older Latinos with diabetes to improve their self-care skills. She is conducting this study collaboratively with Dr. Keith Norris and a research team at Drew. She has designed a similar study that was successfully funded as part of the UCLA Pepper Center competitive renewal that provides additional funds to extend the study to older African Americans. Senior and junior minority faculty at both UCLA (Dr. Arleen Brown) and Drew (Drs. Keith Norris, Diana Echevarry and Jose Calderon) are active co-investigators in these studies and play important roles in many aspects of the research. During the past 5 years, Dr. Mangione also has developed a scholarly program to study the organizational level and patient level determinants of quality of care for older persons with diabetes and methods for improving the care that older persons with diabetes receive. As part of this program and with funding from the California Healthcare Foundation and collaboration from the American Geriatrics Society, Dr. Mangione co-led the development of a geriatric clinical guideline for diabetes care.

Dr. Mangione has extensive research mentorship experience. She has been the primary research mentor for 15 physician fellows, many of whom have become assistant professors, 5 of whom are minority investigators. Since 2000, she also has been a member of the advisory board for the NIA UCLA Mentored Clinician Scientist Program in Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, and is the research mentor for one of the awardees. During 2003, Dr. Mangione was the primary research mentor for 4 extramurally funded career development awards. She is also Associate Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, and coordinates research training with Dr. Wells.

Jeanne Miranda, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA. She has focused her research on improving mental health outcomes of low-income and minority communities, especially through facilitating evidence-based treatments for depression. Dr. Miranda has conducted a number of practical trials of treatment of depression in impoverished minority groups, including the WeCare project recently published in JAMA. She is Co-PI of all three NIH Centers supporting CHIC pilots, and directs their Community Cores: the UCLA/RAND NIMH Center, and of project EXPORT and CHIME. She is PI of a main CHIC pilot study for this proposal, that adapts evidence-based lifestyle change interventions (diet and exercise) for low-income and minority communities. She developed one of the intervention models for Partners in Care and is PI of the UCLA sub for this project. She is PI of an NIMH grant using data from WeCare, PIC, and Healthcare for Communities to examine stigma-related concerns of persons with depression, and their implications for access to and quality of care for depression. Dr. Miranda was the Senior Scientific Editor of Mental Health: Culture, Race and Ethnicity, A Supplement to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General, published August 2001.

Martin Shapiro, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Medicine at David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He is Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research in the Department of Medicine and Associate Director of the UCLA Clinical Scholars Program. From 2002-2003, he served as President of the Society of General Internal Medicine. Dr. Shapiro's research has focused on the general theme of assuring that medical care is applied equitably and appropriately to the population. He is Co-PI of the HCSUS study and is currently PI of the UCLA grant for the Drew/UCLA/RAND Project Export. He is an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and of the Association of American Physicians.

Lillian Gelberg, M.D., M.S.P.H., is the main liaison to the Community Clinic Association of Los Angeles County. She will work with CCALAC to build additional clinics into the CHIC network over time. She is the George F. Kneller Professor of Family Medicine in the UCLA School of Medicine. She is a family physician who conducts community-based research on the health (physical health, mental health, drug and alcohol abuse), access to care, and quality of care of homeless and other vulnerable populations. She has studied homeless adults living in shelters and outdoor areas, and the health and use of health services among homeless and low-income housed patients. Dr. Gelberg and Dr. Ronald Andersen revised developed the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, for which they received the Article of the Year award of the Association for Health Services Research. Dr. Gelberg has been Principal Investigator of 12 grants, primarily funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Gelberg is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and formerly received the Association for Health Services Research 1995 Young Investigator Award. She was the first recipient of the Family Practice Excellence in Research Award from the California Academy of Family Physicians (2001).

Toni Kuo, M.D., M.S.H.S., is a family physician with a background in bioengineering who has studied mechanical mechanisms to improve therapies for hip fractures and osteoarthritis. He is the PI of a state wide study in California of complementary and alternative medicine. He is an investigator with Dr. Gelberg, in building a practice-based research network (PBRN) using the Community Clinic Association of Los Angeles County (CCALAC), and the primary care clinics from UCLA's Multicampus Research Group.

Michael A. Rodriguez, M.D., M.P.H., serves as the main liaison to AltaMed, facilitating their involvement in the proposed infrastructure development activities and in new research projects. Dr. Rodriguez is Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He is a leading researcher regarding the role of the healthcare system in addressing abuse and the healthcare needs of ethnically diverse populations across the age spectrum. He uses qualitative and quantitative methods to develop conceptual frameworks for understanding cultural issues, barriers to help seeking, and for improving the health care for ethnically diverse populations. Dr. Rodriguez is currently PI of a cohort study of domestic violence, a study to examine the impact of domestic violence on the health related quality of life of pregnant Latinas attending a large health maintenance organization in Los Angeles. He is also PI of a study of elder abuse and neglect in ethnically diverse populations.

Douglas S. Bell, M.D., Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at UCLA and a consultant at RAND. In addition to his clinical training in general internal medicine, Dr. Bell has completed a 3-year medical informatics fellowship at Harvard and MIT, and a Ph.D. in Health Services at UCLA. Dr. Bell has conducted research in electronic medical records, online physician education, and Web-based surveys. His awards include First Prize in the American Medical Informatics Association Student Paper Competition, and in 2002 he was named a Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Faculty Physician Scholar. Current projects include studies of Web-based physician education, electronic prescribing systems, and telemedicine to improve access to eye care for urban under-served populations.

Allison Diamant, M.D., M.S.H.S., is an Assistant Professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine. Dr. Diamant's research focuses access to and quality of care for low-income and uninsured populations, breast cancer care for uninsured women, racial and ethnic disparities in colorectal cancer diagnosis and the effect of sexual orientation on access to health care and health status.

Youlim Choi, M.A., manages all Information Technology (IT) activities for the UCLA-NPI Health Services Research Center. With extensive IT experience, he provides overall consultation to Center investigators on IT issues, including facilitating their use of the Center website, having adequate training to utilize IT, and consulting on options to use IT strategies within their projects to facilitate data management, data collection, project management and implementation. He developed the innovative web-based data management system to support a multicenter trial of a disease management program for late-life depression in primary care (Project IMPACT). Currently, he is expanding the capacity of the website to enable better, more sophisticated communication between Center investigators and with our research partners. Those templates and approaches are available to facilitate the proposed CHIC HIT development activities.

Naihua Duan, Ph.D., is a biostatistician and Professor of Psychiatry and Biostatistics at UCLA where he is affiliated with the Neuropsychiatric Institute's Center for Community Health, the Health Services Research Center, and the AIDS Institute. He was a lead statistician for the Health Insurance Experiment, Medical Outcomes Study, and Partners in Care. Dr. Duan's interests extend to a variety of design issues such as the design of multilevel studies (randomization at the clinic level vs. randomization at the individual level vs. split-plot designs that randomize at multiple levels; the trade-off between having more groups vs. having more individuals per group, etc.), how the use of factorial designs enhance our ability to understand the impact of components of multi-faceted interventions which helps to develop more effective and robust interventions. In addition to study design issues, his interests in statistical methods include transformation models, model robustness, causal inference, multilevel models for clustered and/or longitudinal data, nonparametric and semi-parametric methods.

Leo S. Morales, M.D., Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research in the School of Medicine at UCLA and a Natural Scientist at RAND. Dr. Morales has extensive experience in cross-cultural measurement problems and disparities in health care in multicultural settings. He has extensive clinical experience providing primary health care services to low-income Latino and African American patients. He is currently conducting psychometric research on the cross-cultural equivalence of survey instruments and substantive research on disparities in health care, immigrant and Latino health and cultural competence in health care.

Teresa Seeman, Ph.D., is proposed as a member of the Practical Trial Design Work Group. She is a Professor in the Division of Geriatrics at the UCLA School of Medicine. As an epidemiologist with postdoctoral training in neuroendocrinology, she has extensive experience in community-based, epidemiologic research focusing on the impact of social and psychological factors in health and aging, including studies of heart disease, cognitive and physical functioning, and longevity. Dr. Seeman is one of the PIs for Mac Arthur Study of Successful Aging (MSSA). Her published work using MSSA data includes a series of articles demonstrating relationships between various social and psychological characteristics as predictors of risk for cognitive and physical decline with aging. Dr. Seeman has also led numerous analyses based on MSSA data documenting links between various biological risk factors and major health outcomes, including cognitive and physical functioning and mortality. Dr. Seeman is currently one of the leading investigators in the area of empirical research on allostatic load (AL), including efforts to operationalize AL and to test its construct validity with respect to various major health outcomes as well as documenting the sources of population differences in cumulated AL such as childhood and adult social and economic conditions.

Antronette (Toni) Yancey, M.D., M.P.H., is an Associate Professor at the Department of Health Services in the UCLA School of Public Health and is affiliated with the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control Research, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. She recently established the Physical Activity Promotion-Obesity Prevention & Control Collaborative (PAP-OPCC) at the UCLA School of Public Health. Through this Collaborative, Dr. Yancey examines and promotes population approaches to fitness improvement and weight management. This Collaborative is particularly focused on addressing ethnic disparities in disease risk and burden, targeting underserved and understudied communities that are at increased risk for obesity and inactivity-related chronic diseases. She is currently involved in several NIH- and CDC-funded research studies in this area.

Thomas R. Belin, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biostatistics, UCLA School of Public Health, with a joint appointment in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He has extensive experience in clinical research projects, having been affiliated with the NPI Health Services Research Center since 1995. In particular, he has played active roles in the design and/or analysis of results from the national Healthcare for Communities survey, the IMPACT study of an intervention for late-life depression, the WeCare study of interventions for low-income women with depression, and the Los Angeles County Foster Care Study. Dr. Belin specializes in statistical methods for handling incomplete data and has extensive experience in survey design and analysis, under two NIMH-funded research grants on methods for handling missing data, including an ongoing R01 project entitled "Imputation for Moderate-Sized Mental Health Studies."

Joel Braslow, M.D., Ph.D., is a psychiatrist and historian whose work focuses on the social, cultural, and scientific constitution of therapeutic practices in medicine and psychiatry. His work examines twentieth-century American psychiatric practices, employing historical and health services research methods. He is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA. Dr. Braslow is PI of a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Career Development Award and aims to integrate methods from history, anthropology, and health services research. His focus is on how developments in science methods have shaped clinical practice, and vice versa.

Sheryl Kataoka, M.D., M.S.H.S., is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at UCLA and a Scientist in the NPI Health Services Research Center. Her research career has focused on the access to and provision of culturally appropriate mental health services for poor and ethnic minority children. Her investigation of child mental health service use nationally, using three large nationally representative data sources, found disparities in care by ethnic minority children and the uninsured (Kataoka, Zhang, & Wells, 2002), won the American Psychiatric Association's Young Investigator Article of the Year Award for Health Services Research. She has been co-Principal Investigator for the Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS) Program, a school-based cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for students exposed to community violence, that is a main intervention resource for this project and the basis for the QueensCare project. Dr. Kataoka is PI of an NIMH career development award and an investigator in the NIMH UCLA/RAND Center.

Anne Staunton, Ph.D., M.P.H., is the Director of Program Development and Evaluation at the Venice Family Clinic. Ms. Staunton supports the Chief Development Officer by leading a Grants Division that raises over $2 million annually from foundations and corporations to support Clinic operations, including appropriate evaluation research and quality improvement activities. She supports the Medical Director in quality improvement and quality assurance activities, conducts or supervises evaluation and reporting activities and writes grants to maintain or develop new Clinic programs. Ms. Staunton serves as the Research Officer for the Clinic's Board-appointed Research Committee. Ms. Staunton has a Ph.D. in medical anthropology and an M.P.H., both from UCLA. She is fluent in Spanish.

Myles Spar, M.D., M.P.H., is Staff Physician and Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine. He came to the Venice Family Clinic in 2002 after eight years of clinical practice, health services research, international work and management consulting experience. Dr. Spar provides clinical care to indigent patients, including many who are homeless and those with multiple chronic diseases and/or HIV. In addition, Dr. Spar is a team leader and primary clinician of Quality Improvement efforts in Disease Management at the Clinic, having supported development of the diabetes HIT tool.

Ruth Klap, Ph.D., is a sociologist and Assistant Researcher in the UCLA-NPI Health Services Research Center, and an investigator for the UCLA-NPI NIMH Center's Methods and Community Cores. Her research interests span research methods, ethnic disparities, domestic violence, trauma, and mental health and substance abuse. She also directs data management for the NIMH Center and coordinates development of the IT resources of the Center with Mr. Choi. Dr. Klap is currently Co-PI of Caring For Our Youth, an assessment of mental health need within the Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice System; Project Director for Healthcare for Communities; and Co-PI of an NIMH RO1 to examine the consequences of stigma-related concerns of depressed individuals.

Robert A. Dennis, Ph.D., is the managing director of the Computing Technologies Research Lab at the David Geffen School of Medicine (DGSOM), UCLA. His research interests and current projects center on medical informatics; clinical and research data collection, management, and reporting; Internet-based decision support authoring tools; interactive educational technology, communication, collaboration, learning, and assessment systems. Prior to joining the DGSOM, he was a director of the Interactive Media Group at the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging in the Department of Molecular and Medical Imaging.

Lily Zhang, M.S., is a Senior Statistician at the UCLA-NPI Health Services Research Center. She has extensive experience in data programming and statistical analysis and has significantly contributed to many Center projects, including Healthcare for Communities, Partners in Care, IMPACT, and training of clinicians in statistical analysis procedures through the Faculty Scholars Training Program.

Cristina Punzalan has a background as a health promoter for the Peace Corps, and also served in the administrative offices at Berkeley. She has training in conducting focus groups and interviewers of administrators. She is the primary project manager for the Lifestyle Balance Project, a main CHIC pilot project for this proposal.

Marleen Wong, M.S.W., a UCLA consultant, is a clinical psychiatric social worker and the director of LAUSD Crisis Counseling and Intervention Services and District Crisis Teams. In her role as director, Ms. Wong has administrative responsibility of the 250 member multi-disciplinary crisis intervention teams comprised of counselors, nurses, psychologists, social workers, and school police. The team is trained and ready to respond to critical incidents involving the injury or death of a student or staff person, including interventions appropriate to ameliorating critical and traumatic situations for the 900 schools and offices of LAUSD. She has collaborated with academic partners to provide mental health services for students traumatized by violence in the Mental Health Intervention Project (MHIP, also known as CBITS). Ms. Wong represented the U.S. Department of Education under both the Bush and Clinton administrations to assist schools after large scale tragedies such as the 1992 civil unrest and the Northridge earthquake in Los Angeles in 1994, the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City, the earthquake in Kobe, Japan, the riots in St. Petersburg, Florida, the tragic school shootings in Springfield, Oregon, Littleton, Colorado, and Santee, California and the terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington, D.C. Ms. Wong is the Co-Chair of the Community Advisory Board of the UCLA Clinical Scholars Program. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine's Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health, and has served on several IOM committees.

 chic Partners Contact


CHIC Key People and Partner Organizations
(Logos are linked to organization web sites where possible)

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science

Keith C. Norris, M.D. A nephrologists, he is Professor of Internal Medicine at Drew. He is Associate Dean for Research and the Director of the NIH/Research Center for Minority Institutions funded Clinical Research Center.. He is the editor-in-chief of the international medical journal "Ethnicity and Disease." His research interests include renal osteodystrophy, the epidemiology, prevention, and treatment of hypertension and chronic kidney disease, integrative medicine and the reduction of health disparities. He is active in community education around broad issues impacting minority health and is the principal investigator for the NIH funded Excellence in Partnerships for Community Outreach, Research on Health Disparities and Training Center (Project EXPORT).

Dr. Norris is also the Principal Investigator for "Healthy African American Families," a collaboration between community, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Drew and UCLA started in 1992 to overcome the negative perceptions and barriers that impede optimizing family health in the Los Angeles African American community.

Keisha Paxton, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist, is Associate Director of Social and Behavioral Research for the Center for AIDS Research, Education and Services (Drew CARES). This work includes collaborating and consulting with local community-based HIV/AIDS organizations in the areas of designing research/evaluation plans, overseeing the implementation of the evaluations, and overseeing data collection, input, and analyses. Her research interests include sexual risk behavior among African American adolescents, HIV/STD prevention, sexual health program development for African-American women and the intersection of mental health and risk behavior.

Jean Davis, D.C.M., is active in community outreach focusing mainly on HIV, as well as increasing community participation in community trials. She has done extensive community outreach with Loretta Jones and Dr. Norris over the last 5 years.

Loretta Jones, M.A., is the founder and Executive Director of Healthy African American Families II. As a "Community Gatekeeper," Loretta Jones has dedicated her career towards building hope and promoting healing of diverse communities of color, and society-at-large in relation to communities of color. Her extensive career as a civil rights activist, health policy advocate, and social architect has spanned more than 30 years. She is an investigator on the NIMH UCLA/RAND Center, the NIA CHIME Center, and the Drew/UCLA/RAND Export Center. She heads the Social Justice work group, and is a main council member, for the oversight and development of NICHD's 20-year, longitudinal child study. She is the co-Chair with Dr. Wells of the Witness for Wellness Project, one of the main CHIC pilot projects for this proposed project.

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CHIC Key People and Partner Organizations
(Logos are linked to organization web sites where possible)


Marie S. Torres, Ph.D., L.C.S.W., A.C.S.W.,
is Senior Vice President of Long Term Care, Youth Services and Government Relations for AltaMed Health Services Corporation in Los Angeles. Dr. Torres joined AltaMed in June of 1991. During her tenure at AltaMed, Dr. Torres has directed the expansion of senior services including the development and implementation of the first Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) in Southern California, four new adult day health care centers, new case management programs targeting functionally impaired adults, and other home and community-based long term care services in the Latino and other multicultural underserved communities. As an advocate for vulnerable populations, Dr. Torres has been instrumental in preserving health care benefits and services for seniors, disabled adults and families.

Behavioral Health Services (BHS)
Jim Gilmore, M.B.A.,
is the Director of Residential/Outpatient Services at BHS Inc., since 1988. He has been actively involved in expanding services to include Co-Occurring Disorders at BHS and is Chair of the Los Angeles County Task Force on Substance Abusing Mentally Ill, Co-Convener of the LA County Service Area VIII, Co-Occurring Disorders Advisory Council and a member of the LA County Dual Diagnosis Staff Development Committee.

 
June Levine, R.N., M.S.N., C.N.A., serves as the Director of Clinical Programs at the Community Clinic Association of Los Angeles County focusing on quality improvements and bioterrorism preparedness for the community clinics in Los Angeles. She has spent over ten years in hospital executive positions.

 
Loretta Jones, M.A., is the founder and Executive Director of Healthy African American Families II. As a "Community Gatekeeper," Loretta Jones has dedicated her career towards building hope and promoting healing of diverse communities of color, and society-at-large in relation to communities of color. Her extensive career as a civil rights activist, health policy advocate, and social architect has spanned more than 30 years. She is an investigator on the NIMH UCLA/RAND Center, the NIA CHIME Center, and the Drew/UCLA/RAND Export Center. She heads the Social Justice work group, and is a main council member, for the oversight and development of NICHD's 20-year, longitudinal child study. She is the co-Chair with Dr. Wells of the Witness for Wellness Project, one of the main CHIC pilot projects for this proposed project.

Aziza Wright-Lucas, M.Ed., is the Deputy Director at HAAF. Ms. Wright will oversee the operations of the Public Participation Work Group, as part of the Operations team for the project. She will also be lead administrator for the HAAF-sponsored conferences at the Los Angeles Science Center for building community collaboration and participation in local practical trials.

 
Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD)
Marleen Wong, M.S.W.,
a UCLA consultant, is a clinical psychiatric social worker and the director of LAUSD Crisis Counseling and Intervention Services and District Crisis Teams. In her role as director, Ms. Wong has administrative responsibility of the 250 member multi-disciplinary crisis intervention teams comprised of counselors, nurses, psychologists, social workers, and school police. The team is trained and ready to respond to critical incidents involving the injury or death of a student or staff person, including interventions appropriate to ameliorating critical and traumatic situations for the 900 schools and offices of LAUSD. She has collaborated with academic partners to provide mental health services for students traumatized by violence in the Mental Health Intervention Project (MHIP, also known as CBITS). Ms. Wong represented the U.S. Department of Education under both the Bush and Clinton administrations to assist schools after large scale tragedies such as the 1992 civil unrest and the Northridge earthquake in Los Angeles in 1994, the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City, the earthquake in Kobe, Japan, the riots in St. Petersburg, Florida, the tragic school shootings in Springfield, Oregon, Littleton, Colorado, and Santee, California and the terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington, D.C. Ms. Wong is the Co-Chair of the Community Advisory Board of the UCLA Clinical Scholars Program. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine's Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health, and has served on several IOM committees.

 


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Los Angeles County Deprtment of Health Services (DHS)
A. Belinda Towns, M.D., M.P.H.,
is Interim Medical Director for Los Angeles County Department of Health Services - Public Health Programs and the Area Health Officer for LA County Service Planning Areas 5 and 6. Dr. Towns previously served as the Director of the Urban Initiative at Charles R. Drew University and Regional Director for the Worldwide HOPE for Kids Program. Dr. Towns earned her medical and public health degrees from the University of California, Los Angeles and a Bachelors degree from Stanford University. Her clinical experience includes work at Kaiser Permanente, the Watts Health Foundation, and private practice. She is the primary DHS liaison for all NIH Centers in the CHIC infrastructure.

Jonathan Fielding, M.D., M.P.H., M.A., M.B.A., is a CHIC Advisory Board Member. He is the Director of Public Health and Health Officer for Los Angeles County where he is responsible for the full range of public health activities for ten million county residents. He is also a Professor of UCLA's Department of Health Services and Pediatrics and Co-Director of the UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities. He is also director of the Dr.P.H. Program in the Department of Health Services. His areas of expertise include the development of clinical preventive services guidelines, prevention economics and financing, and health promotion for children, adults and families in community, clinical and occupational settings.


Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health (DMH)
Carol Roeloffs, M.D., M.S.,
is a Regional Medical Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, serving in this position since 2002. Previously she worked for the Department's IMD Quality of Care Initiative, training facility staff and surveying care of long term hospitalized clients with severe mental illness. She has completed a research fellowship at the UCLA Health Services Research Center and earned a master's degree in health services at the UCLA School of Public Health. She has published papers in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national professional meetings on the subjects of substance use and stigma. Through an unrestricted grant from Eli Lilly and Co., Dr. Roeloffs has been studying prescribing practices in public mental health. She is a clinical instructor at UCLA- Neuropsychiatric Institute and serves as the liaison to the UCLA-NPI Health Services Research Center. She is a former NIMH Faculty Scholar.

Kathleen Daly, M.D., M.P.H., is a Regional Medical Director in Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health and Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA. She is a former Clinical Scholar, and is an investigator for the Witness for Wellness CHIC pilot for this proposal.

Marvin Southard, D.S.W., is the Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, the largest public mental health system in the county, serving over 200,000 clients annually in one of the most ethnically diverse counties in the nation and with a budget of over $1 billion. Dr. Southard is the recipient of NAMI's 2003 award for Excellence in Community Mental Health Service in recognition of his ongoing efforts to build a comprehensive community care mental health system in Los Angeles County.

James Allen is Deputy Director of Los Angeles County Adult Systems of Care, and is proposed as a member of the Network Management team.

Roderick Shaner, M.D., is the Medical Director of the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health (DMH. His major responsibility is to work closely with consumers, families, providers and administrators to ensure high quality DMH clinical services). Dr. Shaner is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the USC School of Medicine.


Beverly Froelich, C.F.R.E., Olive View Foundation
has occupied the post of Executive Director of Olive View-UCLA Medical Center Foundation since 1987. Beverly is the immediate past president of the Greater San Fernando Valley Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Executives (formerly National Society of Fundraising Executives) and the founder of the Valley Branch of the Arthritis Foundation's Southern California Chapter. Her other commitments include the VICA Healthcare Committee, California State University Northridge Fundraising and Institutional Development Certificate Program Advisory Board, San Fernando Valley Advisory Commission for City Councilman Jack Weiss, and the Los Angeles Children's Museum Commission. Beverly has been honored with Fundraising Executive of the Year Award from the Greater San Fernando Valley Chapter of Association of Association of Fundraising Professionals, the Jane Wyman Award, and the Marilyn Magaram Award for her work in providing health education to diverse populations. She is a graduate of the Fundraising Program at USC and the Public Relations Program at UCLA.

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Margarita Alegría, Ph.D., is primary liaison to DREW/UCLA Project EXPORT and NIMH Centers, which are also developing new work on community-based interventions. She is Director of the Center for Multicultural Mental Health Research at Cambridge Health Alliance. Prior to this she was Director of the Center for Evaluation and Sociomedical Research (CESR) and as professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Puerto Rico. She has devoted her professional career to researching disparities in mental health and substance abuse services for Latinos and other minority populations. She is currently the Principal Investigator of three National Institute of Mental Health-funded research studies. The Latino Research Program Project (LRPP) focuses on research to improve the mental health care of Latino populations. The National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) estimates the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and the use of mental health services among Latinos and Asians in the United States. The NLAAS also plans to make comparisons to non-Latino whites and African Americans. The Excellence in Partnerships for Community Outreach, Research on Health Disparities and Training (EXPORT) proposes to generate and test interventions that can remedy service disparities in asthma and mental health for disadvantaged Latino and African Caribbean populations.

  Susan Fuentes, R.N., is the Vice President of QueensCare Health & Faith Partnership in Los Angeles. She administers a large Parish Nursing program, including management of 25 program staff and resources including a $1.2 million budget. Ms. Fuentes is a licensed nurse and belongs to numerous professional committees, including the California Healthcare Association Steering Committee, Health Ministries Association, and the QueensCare Education and Outreach Committee. Ms. Fuentes is a member of the Advisory Board of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program and of the UCLA/RAND NIMH Center.

 Mary Woolley, M.A., is President of Research!America, the nation's largest alliance of groups and individuals committed to making medical and health research a much higher national priority. At Research!America, she pioneered the use of public opinion polling in the medical and health research community, helping researchers better understand public attitudes and questions about research, and assisting advocates in making the case for research to the public, the media and elected officials. Woolley is a member of the Institutes of Medicine and serves on its Health Science Policy Board.

 

Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR)

 


Sylvia Drew Ivie, J.D., is Executive Director of the T.H.E. (To Help Everyone) Clinic, a non-profit primary health care facility in Los Angeles, California serving primarily African American, Latino, and Asian Pacific Islander patients and their families. Prior to her work at T.H.E Clinic, Ms. Ivie practiced poverty and civil rights law with the National Health Law Program in Los Angeles, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund in New York and the U.S. Officer for Civil Rights in the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington D.C. Through participation with Kaiser Family Foundation Commission on the Future of Medicaid and the Uninsured (1991 to present), President Clinton's Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection and Quality in Health Care Industry (1997), the Institute of Medicine's Studies of Unintended Pregnancy (1998), the Institute of Medicine's Quality of Care Oversight in Federally Financed Programs (2001-2002), and the California African American Summit on HIV/AIDS Steering Committee, SCLC/LA, and the Children's Bureau, She was recently appointed to a Center for Disease Control Blue Ribbon Panel on evaluating efforts to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in health care.

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  The UCLA/RAND Center for Adolescent Health Promotion is a collaboration between the UCLA School of Public Health, the UCLA Department of Pediatrics, RAND, and our community partners. The Center conducts community-based participatory research, develops programs, disseminates findings, and provides education and training related to adolescent health promotion. Our research agenda, established with our community partners, responds to community needs and addresses national, regional, and local health priorities and disparities related to adolescent health. We focus on activities that can be incorporated into community practice and build community capacities.

  

 

  Kenneth B. Wells, M.D., M.P.H., is Professor-in-Residence of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA-Semel Health Services Research Center and Senior Scientist at RAND. He is a psychiatrist and health services researcher. Dr. Wells is the Principal Investigator of the NIMH-funded UCLA/RAND Center for Research Quality in Managed Care; the Robert Wood Johnson-funded Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Supplement to the Community Tracking Study; and of the Partners in Care (PIC) Study funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), The MacArthur Foundation, and the National Institute of Mental Health.

Dr. Wells directs the UCLA-NPI Health Services Research Center, which focuses on improving quality of care for psychiatric and neurologic disorders across the lifespan. He us Director of the UCLA Clinical Scholars Program, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Wells is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and currently is Chair of the Institute of Medicine's Neuroscience and Behavioral Health Board. He was the first recipient of the Young Investigator Award and more recently honored with the Distinguished Investigator Award by AcademyHealth. He was also a recipient of an NIMH Senior Research Scientist Award in mental health services research and of the Senior Health Services Research Award of the American Psychiatric Association.

UCLA Clinical Scholars Program prepares physicians to lead medicine into a new era of community and consumer-relevant healthcare. We encourage the integration of skills in program development and research methodology to find solutions for issues in public policy, community intervention and health services research. The major thrust of the first year of the program is learning to partner with communities in work that serves their needs and Scholars will spend much of their first year working in community locations with one of the program’s main partners. This experience will serve as a basis for subsequent work, whether community intervention, policy, or health services research.

Over the course of two years, Scholars receive centralized leadership training through the national program coupled with intensive local training at UCLA on issues and methods in creating healthcare changes at the community and policy levels. The curriculum is based on a social, behavioral, and community conceptual framework. It combines didactic and experiential teaching methods. Scholars are expected to build on their own talents, as well as those of their mentors and community partners, to become agents for improving health and healthcare. In particular, it is expected that Scholars will lead the way to improving the health of vulnerable populations and overcome health and health care disparities that affect these populations. Scholars also participate in clinical programs at the UCLA Medical Center, Harbor UCLA Medical Center, King Drew Medical Center, and the Veterans Administration Hospitals at Brentwood, Sepulveda, and Wadsworth.

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Anne Staunton, Ph.D., M.P.H., is the Director of Program Development and Evaluation at the Venice Family Clinic. Ms. Staunton supports the Chief Development Officer by leading a Grants Division that raises over $2 million annually from foundations and corporations to support Clinic operations, including appropriate evaluation research and quality improvement activities. She supports the Medical Director in quality improvement and quality assurance activities, conducts or supervises evaluation and reporting activities and writes grants to maintain or develop new Clinic programs. Ms. Staunton serves as the Research Officer for the Clinic's Board-appointed Research Committee. Ms. Staunton has a Ph.D. in medical anthropology and an M.P.H., both from UCLA. She is fluent in Spanish.

Myles Spar, M.D., M.P.H., is Staff Physician and Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine. He came to the Venice Family Clinic in 2002 after eight years of clinical practice, health services research, international work and management consulting experience. Dr. Spar provides clinical care to indigent patients, including many who are homeless and those with multiple chronic diseases and/or HIV. In addition, Dr. Spar is a team leader and primary clinician of Quality Improvement efforts in Disease Management at the Clinic, having supported development of the diabetes HIT tool.

 


Paul G. Shekelle, M.D., Ph.D., is proposed as a member of the Advisory Board, as the primary liaison to the VA. Dr. Shekelle is a consultant in health sciences at RAND, Professor of Medicine at the UCLA School of Medicine, and a staff physician at the VA Medical Center in West Los Angeles. His research focus has been in the application of innovative methods to the assessment and improvement of the quality of care. Dr. Shekelle is been the Director of the Southern California Evidence-Based Practice Center, and has led numerous systematic reviews and meta-analyses in that capacity. Dr. Shekelle also co-directs the Assessing Care of the Vulnerable Elderly project, which seeks to develop a comprehensive set of quality tools to assess care for this population.

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Government agency participation

NIH

 

Other Important Links

National Institute of Child Health & Human Development
NIH Roadmap (Accelerating Medical Discovery to Improve Health)
National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases
National Institute on Aging
CRISP database
http://salud.nih.gov/
http://www.healthypeople.gov
http://raceandhealth.hhs.gov
http://www.omhrc.gov/omhhome.htm
http://healthdisparities.nih.gov/resource.html
http://www.omhrc.gov/omhrc/index.htm
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